4 Nigerian religious kidnapped sisters released

Nigeria: Nigeria, four sisters who some people kidnapped on their way to Mass on August 21, have been finally released as per order.

Nigerian religious kidnapped sisters released
Nigerian religious kidnapped sisters released

Nigeria: Nigeria, four sisters who some people kidnapped on their way to Mass on August 21, have been finally released as per order.

The name of sisters Johannes Nwodo, Christabel Echemazu, Liberata Mbamalu, and Benita Agu were kidnapped on August 21 in Nigeria’s Imo state, located in the south of the country. 

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Their family did “intense prayer” for their quick and safe release the Sisters of Jesus the Saviour announced the abductees’ “unconditional and safe release” in a statement on August 23. 

Statements read: “Today is a memorable day for us; we wish to share this joy with everyone who, one way or the other, has contributed to the quick and safe release of our god sisters.”

The Sisters of Jesus the Saviour is a Nigerian order that cares for the poor, elderly, and sick. The order did not provide details about who may have perpetrated the kidnapping. 

Moreover, these Christian kidnappings in Nigeria are increasing day by day, and this situation has encouraged Church leaders to express their serious concern about the security and safety of their members and to call the government to prioritise the security of its citizens. 

Priests, in particular, are often kidnapped and held for ransom. 

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On July 11, the Nigerian Diocesan Catholic Priests Association stated the attacks, saying, “it is unfortunate that in the course of their normal pastoral activities, priests have become an endangered species.”

In July, Father John Mark Cheitnum and Father Donatus Cleopas were abducted at the rectory of Christ the King Catholic Church in the town of Lere in Nigeria’s northern Kaduna State. Cleopas was released, but Cheitnum was killed brutally.  

Security expert David Otto, director of the Geneva Centre for Africa Security and Strategic Studies, based in Geneva, Switzerland, told CNA in July that the consensus of security experts in his group is that the Catholic Church is being targeted because it has been paying the steep ransoms the terrorists have demanded, which can be as high as $200,000, or more.