Pakistan NSC concludes Two-Day meeting to address TTP threat

Pakistan: The National Security Committee (NSC) of Pakistan has just concluded a two-day huddle to consider options on how to handle the increasing threat posed by Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) and other extremist groups.

Pakistan: The National Security Committee (NSC) of Pakistan has just concluded a two-day huddle to consider options on how to handle the increasing threat posed by Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) and other extremist groups.

As per the reports, Islamabad’s friends have been unable to control the TTP, and it was since when America withdrew from Afghanistan two years back, attacks by the TTP have increased drastically.

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Pakistan residents have zero-tolerance power for terrorism and do not permit any country to commit violence inside Pakistan, and they did not even show anyone that their army is fully fledged, ready to hit back at TTP.

The government of Kabul expressed their dissatisfaction with Pakistan’s Interior Minister Rana Sanaullah’s statement that there is a possibility that Islamabad will attack TTP shelters in Afghanistan.

Although the Taliban won’t stop the TTP, their spokesperson, Zabihullah Mujahid, criticised the idea of possible transgression by its neighbour.

The major problem that the country is facing is that the TTP is trying to convince other countries, and locals are predicting the reason behind attacks rising in the nation is Pakistan’s bad politics.

It also seemed that the security of Pakistan was filled with anger due to attacks in Balochistan that have led to more crackdowns on the Balochistan residents.

Pakistan Army Chief General Asim Munir and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee, General Sahir Shamshad Mirza, carrying the coffin of a young officer recently killed in an attack in Balochistan.

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After the 2000s, Pakistan was rocked by terrorism and various attacks by the Taliban and all the other activities against Pakistan.

In Islamabad, one of the police officers died due to suicide, and it was a reminder for the Pakistan capital, like Quetta, Karachi, Peshawar, and many other cities in Pakistan. That was the time when no one wanted to return to the military, politicians or ordinary people.