Whole world talks about Ukraine, but nobody is talking about my relatives in Tigray, says Kainerugaba

As we all are aware of the present scenario of Russia and Ukraine, we all want a quick update on what is happening there and what will be their further actions or measures.

In the midst of the Russia & Ukraine war, we forget and totally ignore the current situation in Tigray, and that is why ‘Muhoozi Kainerugaba’ put his small effort into reminding people of Africa by posting a post on Twitter.

Kainerugaba wrote on his Twitter account that the whole world is talking about Ukraine, but no one is talking about my relatives in Tigray; with a question mark, and raised his voice How long will our people in Tigray suffer while the world ignores them, and that too with a question mark and next question he asked: “Is that who we are as Ugandans?”

“The whole world is talking about Ukraine, but no one is talking about my relatives in Tigray? How long will our people in Tigray suffer while the world ignores them? Is that who we are as Ugandans?”

It’s been 18 months of conflict between the federal government and Tigray rebels, and the health sector of the beleaguered region has “totally collapsed”, as per their health officials and doctors.

Health professionals in Tigray said that the shortages are so sensitive that they are using expired drugs in order to treat chronic conditions. In contrast, numerous patients dealing with cancer, diabetes, and HIV have not been treated for months.

Patients are constantly being asked to bring old clothes with them whenever they come to hospitals for surgeries to use as gauze while in operation theatres.

Test tubes, air tubes, and surgical gloves are all being used again, and there’s not enough detergent to wash soiled hospital bed linen.

According to New Humanitarian that this is not like the 21st century anymore; it is more like the 16th or 17th century, and it is requested anonymity like others “Patients just die in front of your eyes.”

Health workers of Tigray are using warm salt water in order to wash wounds, clinics of Tigray received irregular supplies of power, and due to lack of fuel, pregnant women are forced to walk – or be carried on stretchers for days in order to health posts in a bid to deliver their babies.

The patients who are getting proper medical attention are considered lucky; most new mothers prefer to deliver their babies at home.

Those who are receiving medical care are the lucky ones: Mostly, new mothers are delivering at home, alone, meaning thousands of women are likely dying from several health complications, health workers said.

“This is not like the 21st century anymore; it’s more like the 16th or 17th.”